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Porridge is what people eat in England, or do they?

Porridge for some reason* is a synonym of English breakfast

food. If it was said,” British”, I would not mind. You can hear about all the convince of oatmeal, but it does not convince me, never did.Especially when somebody adds ,'It is good for you'


I am not keen on breakfast altogether. Maybe mashed avocado with a hint of garlic and a drop of mayo.Coffee and something to make me run faster after the train, plane, car or that naughty kid from the back desk who took a poster from the wall.But porridge! It is the School breaky (breakfast) of my time! It is Scottish!

It had a bad rap in my time, probably due to horrid experiences of the gritty wallpaper paste doled out for school breakfasts. And all cheerful Scottish friends cannot make you trust the goodness hidden in oatmeal or even to find it with my naked eye! (I ewake my kinetic and logic learning ability.)But my Scottish friends would not stop. On the top of that, they remember 'granny’s holidays', how she poured hot porridge on a plate (kitchen drawer) to cool and set, meaning it could then be sliced and taken to the fields for a mid-morning snack ( you are not getting home just to eat something when pony take you all over the hills), hasn’t helped either.

You can add PORRIDGE as the meaning of a jail sentence literally! (I loved the sitcom)


But getting into sensible age means you listen ( not just watch) to BBC and what those British Scientists find. So not always British bothered to study something as global as oatmeal porridge! ’According to research by Tufts University in Massachusetts, middle and older-aged adults (putting my hand up here) who ate at least three servings a(should be per) day of whole grains such as oats had smaller increases in waist size, blood pressure, and blood-sugar levels over an 18-year period compared with those who ate less than half a serving daily.” But not decreases ah!



Mrs Beeton recommends “soaking the oats first, and – better still – cooking them in a bowl set over a pan of simmering water for two to three hours.” I have never ever even tried. I had a go soaking overnight and then cooking it. You can trust Mrs Beeton, can't you? (https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Page:Mrs_Beeton%27s_Book_of_Household_Management.djvu/1505)


But it’s time to forget all that! And try Quakers’ oats !It is as much better for you than instant noodles, that boost you with 2 -day amount of calories, salt,sugar and oil (of the second freshness) . It is not as good as night-soaked oatmeal, but gives you warmth and releases energy slow and right. Recomended even for Diabetes diet.


What makes Right and what makes GOOD porridge?

https://www.eatthismuch.com/food/nutrition/porridge-oats,152950/

Nutrition Facts approx : For a Serving Size of 1 serving (100g)

Calories: 356Calories from Fat 72 (20.2%)% Daily Value *

Total Fat: 8g-Saturated fat 1.5g-Monounsaturated fat 3.8g-Polyunsaturated fat 2.7g-Sodium0mg0%

Carbohydrates: 60g-Net carbs 51g-Fiber 9g36%

Glucose 1.1g Protein11g

The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, So add fruits or double your portion calculation.


And add vanilla and cinnamon!


The Scots might insist on water and salt alone, but there’s surely room to diverge. Mind you, making it only with milk creates a sweet, rich, almost pudding-like creamy breakfast. I add then some nuts and fruits. 'It is muslie'- they cry! And I can add some butter too, while listening to those cries. Ridiculous!- I hear again.

It is not how for many healthy-diet-proper goes.

I like to add milk at the very end of cooking, soaked night in water, which is a little lighter but more indulgent than water alone. used to add stewed apples, chopped pears, and a handful of dried mango bits are all sensible additions, although writing my name in golden syrup or honey on the top brings out the joyful five-year-old in me.

Easy instant nearly porridge? Yes, why not, with those little drops of dried blueberries and mango. Yammy! Lovely when it is cold.

Not your bag? Stick to hot. And why not add a drizzle of honey or golden syrup and a moat of cream around the rim of the bowl? You might even slip in – whisper it – a tot of whiskey, Irish style.

Your porridge, your rules.


So lets bring this word back and use it daily to eat our porridge!

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VOCABULARY:

Shall we look at thoese words in bold. It might be not too complicated,might be easy